Reviews

2017 Honda HR-V Walk Around


The HR-V is perky and blunt, a smooth blend of hatchback and coupe. Honda says it’s designed to look like a coupe, with its short overhangs, sharp creases and aggressive angles. From the front it resembles the larger CR-V, but with a wider front grille and a stronger nose. From the side, the curved roofline is punctuated by a roof spoiler. A sharp, rising character line runs from the door up into the D-pillar. In the rear, a strong crease swoops from the outside of each tail light, creating a wide grin.

Interior

The cabin feels heavy on fabric and plastic. The controls are well laid out, with a five-inch touchscreen on the center stack, and better seven-inch screen on the navigation model, that’s perfectly located in the high center console, that helps separate the driver from the front passenger. Below the center stack there’s a small storage space that can fit a phone, with a USB port. The door pockets are wide and shallow.

The front seats are quite comfortable, with a fine fabric, but small persons might not find a place that fits, with the manual adjustment.

The leather on the top EX-L model feels somewhat stiff.

Rear visibility is good despite a small rear window. When you get used to Honda LaneWatch, it’s helpful. When you flip the turn signal, a screen shows the rearward view of the side of the car that’s turning, from the pov of the sideview mirror.

If you go by total interior space, more than 100 cubic feet in the LX, the HR-V is the roomiest vehicle of its kind. In the rear seat, adults have excellent headroom and legroom.

The 60/40-split rear seat can fold completely flat, and Honda’s Magic Seat that folds and flips the second-row seat like a lawn chair. The rear cargo is square and flat with a ton of space. With the seats up, there’s a fat 25 cubic feet of cargo space; with them down, there’s 58.8 cubic feet. Compare to the Chevy Trax, with 18.7 cubic feet and 48.4 cubic feet.

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